Tag Archive:startups

ByCarolyn Keane

Daymond John: ‘Real entrepreneurs’ will thrive under Trump, despite uncertainty

Daymond John, star of ABC’s hit show “Shark Tank” and entrepreneur behind the $6 billion urban street-wear brand FUBU, says that while a lot is changing in America right now under President Donald Trump, the challenge should please any real entrepreneur.

I “know there is a lot of uncertainty out there, but to a true entrepreneur, that doesn’t matter. We have always had uncertainty,” John said at the Yahoo Finance All Markets Summit Wednesday.

“That’s what an entrepreneur does. They wake up every single day and they deal with adversity.”

Read more:

Daymond John: Real Entrepreneurs will thrive under Trump

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

How Makers Can Catalyze a Manufacturing Renaissance

The article “5 Ways the Maker Movement can help catalyze a manufacturing renaissance” calls for leaders to “embrace the Maker Movement as a deeply American source of decentralized creativity for rebuilding America’s thinning manufacturing ecosystems.”

Mark Muro of the Brookings Institution and Peter Hirshberg, co-author with me of the Maker City guide, are co-authors of the article, which makes the case that the new administration might want to look to the Maker Movement as a way to think about re-vitalizing manufacturing in America. They could look at places such as the Columbus Idea Factory in Ohio.

Read more

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

From Australia to Germany to Seattle, Applications Are Open for 13 Techstars Accelerator Programs

Are you considering an accelerator or know someone who is? Applications are now open for the Techstars accelerator. Apply now to join the Techstars network with more than 10,000 mentors, investors and founders. Not a founder? Let us know if there is someone we should be talking to. We’ll also hold global info sessions to connect with the best startups and founders in the world. Stay tuned for more details on these events and how you can meet the Techstars teams from different programs. Most applications close April 9th with programs kicking off in July 2017.Are you considering an accelerator or know someone who is? Applications are now open for the Techstars accelerator. Apply now to join the Techstars network with more than 10,000 mentors, investors and founders. Not a founder? Let us know if there is someone we should be talking to. We’ll also hold global info sessions to connect with the best startups and founders in the world. Stay tuned for more details on these events and how you can meet the Techstars teams from different programs. Most applications close April 9th with programs kicking off in July 2017.

 

Techstarts.com/apply

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

We Fact-Checked Seven Seasons Of Shark Tank Deals. Here Are The Results.

We Fact-Checked Seven Seasons Of Shark Tank Deals. Here Are The Results.
Emily Canal  

FORBES STAFF 

On Shark Tank, the deal you make on camera often isn’t the deal you end up getting — if it happens at all.

How many Sharks invest

How many Sharks invest

Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

The hit ABC show that gives entrepreneurs a chance to pitch celebrity investors depicts some business owners walking away with life-changing deals. But more often than not, those hand-shake agreements change or fall apart after taping.

FORBES found that 319 businesses accepted deals on-air in the first seven seasons of Shark Tank. We spoke to 237 of those business owners and discovered 72% did not get the exact deal they made on TV. But tweaked terms or dead deals don’t necessarily spell doom for a business; for many contestants we spoke to, the publicity of appearing on the show ended up being worth more than the deal.

Shark Tank New Data

Shark Tank New Dat: Nick DeSantis, Forbes staff

About 43% of the people we spoke with said their deals didn’t come to fruition after the show. They attributed this to sharks pulling out of the agreement or changing the terms to ones that didn’t work for them. Others canceled deals after getting term sheets that included unappealing clauses. And occasionally the deals ended amicably.

 

Another 29% of the people FORBES interviewed said the equity and investment amount offered on-air changed after taping — but they chose to take the deal anyway. They said that the changes often occur during negotiations or in due diligence, an investigation into a person or business before signing a contract.

Although our analysis was not exhaustive (FORBES was able to interview 74% of contestants who got deals on camera), the numbers suggest that some investors are less likely to change their deals after the cameras stop rolling. Mark Cuban, who by our count closes more deals than any other shark, changed the agreements he made on-air change only 12% of the time.

SharkTank Solo Deals

Design: Nick DeSantis, Forbes staff

ABC is transparent about the due diligence process and isn’t accountable for how deals pan out during negotiations. ABC did not return requests for comment by time of publishing.

We contacted as many of the 319 businesses as possible, but some refused to share how and if their deals evolved, and others simply did not respond. While the results aren’t comprehensive, this is the most complete record of how often deals change after taping and why that occurs.

The goal of entrepreneurs going on Shark Tank is to make a deal and see it close. But if it falls apart, it’s not always a tragedy. About 87% of the businesses we spoke to that didn’t get deals are still operating. The remainder have shuttered, were acquired or sold.

Matt Canepa and Pat Pezet appeared on season four of Shark Tank to pitch their company Grinds, which sells chewable coffee pouches. They agreed to give Daymond John and Robert Herjavec 15% equity for $75,000. However, the deal died in negotiations.

“Pat and I went on the show 100% wanting to get a deal,” Canepa said. “Regardless of whether or not you get the deal, there are a lot of success stories.”Design: Holly Warfield, Forbes staff

The Shark Effect

In 2012, before their episode aired, Grinds made about $300,000 in sales. The month their segment premiered, the company saw $330,000 in sales.

Grinds brought in $1.35 million the year their episode aired, and have watched that number rise. This year, they are expecting do over $4 million.

Grinds isn’t alone. Nicholas and Alessia Galekovic, cofounders of the grooming accessories company Beard King, made an agreement with Lori Greiner during season seven last year. But around the time they filmed their episode, business took off, and the deal no longer met the needs of the company.

 

Design: Holly Warfield, Forbes staff

The agreement broke down in negotiations. But in the year after the episode aired, the company did around $700,000 in sales. This year, they are expecting over $1.6 million.

“I think that [Shark Tank is] absolutely amazing,” Nicholas said. “For anyone considering trying out or going for it: It’s well worth it.”

The Shark Effect SharkTank Solo Deals

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

3 TV Shows to Pitch to

Adventure Capitalists

We were invited to participate last season and now the show is a huge success. It is a great premise, 3 venture capitalist personally product test new outdoor adventure products. Talk about Shark Tank, last season they tested a new shark repellent device in the ocean with school of real mean looking sharks, giving new meaning to the term “wetsuit” for one of the capitalists. These guys are crazy and a lot of fun. Check out the show here http://cnb.cx/2eezoKK

They are looking for all types of outdoor products including but not limited to; camping, hiking, adventure, recreation, outdoor transportation, off roading, renewable energy, survival, etc. I suggest you watch the show and present accordingly. Here is the link to apply www.AdventureCapitalists.com   

Harry Wants Women

What a dream come true for the right women, Harry Connick Jr. is looking for women inventors with a great story to tell for his new daytime talk show. This is great exposure! Here is a link to the talent search http://bit.ly/2ddYLZb and here is a link to the show’s website https://www.harryconnickjr.com/

Dave Yonce Show

Below is the information they sent me about the show. Unlike most product hunts, shows are looking more for personality. Their guide lines are an education in themselves that everyone should read.

Asylum Entertainment and a major cable television network known for its loud, creative content is on the hunt for American entrepreneurs with well-developed concepts or prototypes for new inventions. To be considered, the invention must solve a problem, make a job more efficient, or make life more fun. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, electronics, weapons, outdoor recreation, adventure, home products, automotive, and power tools.

If selected to appear on the program, Oklahoma-raised inventor and entrepreneur, Dave Yonce, will invest money and time into you and your product, developing it into a working prototype, and in some cases, partnering with you to build your business.

For more information, email:  Casting@tikicasting.com.

Thank you in advance!

Kristina Hauser
Casting Director 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

Entrepreneurs Call to Action – Apply to Present at 2016 Florida VentureTech Showcase

Apply to present at the upcoming 2016 Florida VentureTech Showcase

at CAMLS (Center for Advanced Medical Learning and Simulation), in downtown Tampa on November 1st from 1:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.

The showcase is a capital acceleration competition and business-networking event co-hosted by Space Florida and the Florida Venture Forum. The event will feature presentations by some of Florida’s most promising growth-stage companies. Additionally, a cross section of investors will be in attendance.  Troy Knauss, instructor, with the Angel Resource Institute, will be the special guest speaker!

Presenting companies will compete for the
Space Florida Accelerating Innovation Awardtotaling
$150,000!
$100,000 for the Winner and $50,000 for the 1st Runner Up!
Presenters will be chosen from a pool of applicants by a selection committee evaluating growth-stage companies from throughout the state of Florida.  Selection criteria for growth stage companies are listed on the Forum’s website. Selection preference will be given to those growth stage companies in information technology and health technology, knowledge-based services, space transportation and advanced aerospace platforms, satellite systems and science payloads, ground and operations support systems, agriculture, climate/environmental monitoring, civil protection and emergency management, International Space Station and human life science (including medical research), communications, cyber security & robotics, adventure tourism, clean /alternative energy applications, advanced materials and new products.
FINAL PRESENTER APPLICATION DEADLINE:
Friday, October 14, 2016
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

South Florida Regional Business & Finance Conference

 

Join us and Get Discovered! Who knows, you may meet someone to fund your idea as well! You won’t want to miss this great event!

Join our panels made up of South Florida’s political candidates, business resource providers, editors & producers of local media, inventors, prime contractors, gov & corp procurement specialists & funders who will answer your questions on: marketing, funding, getting your inventory/product made, on shelves, getting your business certified and leveraging government contracts.

Click here to register

South Florida

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

Founder Institute is Accepting Applications

The Founder Institute is accepting applications for Startups in many different cities around the world. Which one will you attend or participate in?

Founder Institute Locations and Dates

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
ByCarolyn Keane

Patent Financing: Getting funding for patent applications

Russ Krajec is the CEO of BlueIron, a patent finance company, and author ofInvesting In Patents, which explains the BlueIron investment model. Russ is an angel investor, registered patent attorney, the former COO of a venture-backed startup company, and an inventor with 30+ US patents/applications.

lightbulb-moneyYear after year the patent laws become more complex. It seems with every decision from the Supreme Court and the Federal Circuit more detail is mandated for a patent application to be complete and for patent claims to have a fighting chance. These case law changes, as well as legislative and regulatory changes, are putting the patent system out of reach for startup companies.

The patent applications that must be filed require an enormous investment in time, money, and expertise – mostly by patent professionals who curate the inventions, write the patents, and nurture them through the examination process. To get high caliber, well researched, and well-written patents costs money – a lot of money unfortunately.

Quality is the main buzzword at the Patent Office, and increasingly so within the industry. Gone are the days that one could just get a patent and expect that it would be valuable enough to license or sell. Quality patents that cover quality technologies is the new business reality in the patent sector. But with the skyrocketing costs associated with obtaining the desired quality many startups resort to cost-saving strategies that most often only work to irreparably harm the changes of obtaining a worthwhile patent.

Filing a hastily drafted, woefully inadequate provisional patent application is a mistake, and one that can lead to a patent foundation being built on a hopelessly compromised base. The patent community was recently reminded of this fact when the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) refused to recognize the priority of a provisional patent application filed to cover Juxtapid, a cholesterol medication. The PTAB found the provisional application defective because it did not teach the invention adequately and provided insufficient dosage information. This just proves that bad provisional applications are a very real problem even for pharmaceutical companies that should know better.

What are startups to do? There is never enough money to do everything a startup needs to do in order to succeed, so even the best, most well funded startups need to triage. As a patent attorney with over 15 years of experience, I know all too well this very real financial dilemma. Compounding this problem is the truth that most innovative startup companies are entering a marketplace where larger, well-financed corporations with giant patent portfolios dominate. Patents can be the great equalizer, but such a strategy requires high quality patents.

Another reality in the patent industry is that a client will run out of money before a patent attorney has run out of ability to make a patent application better. But what if the client and the patent attorney were not on opposite sides of the spreadsheet with different financial interests? What if their financial interests coincided and the fortune of both rise or fall based on how strong the patent is and whether the client succeeds? This is why I decided several years ago to start BlueIron IP, an investment company that finances patents for startups.

BlueIron’s non-dilutive financing for startups pays all of the patent costs, including filing fees and attorney’s fees, using a conventional commercial “lease-back” arrangement. This model has been gaining traction since its first release in the fall of 2014. After financing professional poker player Phil Gordon’s patent for his new software startup, Chatbox, BlueIron has made investments in startup companies in software, hardware, biotechnology, medical devices, financial services, and agriculture.

By financing the patents, we remove the cost barriers to getting strong, high-quality patents. This opens up the options to do a full due diligence workup, which most startups simply cannot afford. It also means the patents can be expedited and obtained more quickly. It also frees up critical capital for the startup to invest in business activities rather than paying for patents.

For expediting applications, when possible, we prefer the PCT-Patent Prosecution Highway, which often results in an issued patent within 12 months. With PCT-PPH, the costs of the patent are compressed into a 12 month window, rather than spreading them out over 3-5 years. If a patent application gets into the PPH the allowance rates are much higher, and in many cases over 95%. Given that an issued patent is far more valuable to a startup company than a mere pending patent application – especially one raising angel or venture capital – this strategy pays quick dividends, which benefits everyone involved.

The BlueIron model works because everyone has “skin in the game,” so to speak. We have every incentive to get high quality patents and to do so as reasonably quickly as possible. By having a patent portfolio that protects the startups technology additional investment becomes easier to attract, which makes much of the difficult work a startup will do much easier. By helping the innovative startup succeed we succeed. If the innovating startup company is not successful, the investment will only generate patents for products or services that never made it to the market, or which were not accepted once on the market. Patent assets covering technologies the market shunned have little, if any, value. On the other hand, if the startup company is successful the patents have real value – far more value than the cost of financing.

Through the BlueIron model I’ve attempted to create a new framework where both parties have the same goal: protect and grow a successful business. Our sole focus is to build investment-grade patents that have commercial value. By treating patents as “collateral,” our model rises or falls based on how strong the patents are – and how successful the innovative startup becomes.

If you are a startup company that is looking for someone to finance your patent activities please contact me. Candidly, we only invest in patents for operating companies, not for individual inventors for whom the invention is just a hobby. While we invest at a very early stage, the startup must have a financial commitment to bring a product or service to market for us to get involved.

If you are an angel investor or venture capital firm, we are actively seeking formal or information partnerships and relationships.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail