Tag Archive:entrepreneurs

ByCarolyn Keane

Why Entrepreneurs Must Learn to Re-Invent Themselves

Daniel DiPiazza
CONTRIBUTOR
Author

Re-invention can be triggered externally, but must take place internally.Entrepreneurs must develop the power to create the impossible in order to realize their highest potential.

No entrepreneur is happy with maintaining the status quo, even if they’ve achieved success, accolades and comfort from their accomplishments. The “zone of genius” can become a golden anchor.

Most entrepreneurs have a huge vision for themselves that they’ve broken apart and watered down over the years because they are scared of the scope of their dreams. In doing so, they are settling for the smaller incentives that are within reach rather than striving for the bigger prizes on the highest shelves. They stop stretching.

Related: Spring Into Action With These 11 Books About Reinvention

The power to create the impossible is the ability to first acknowledge these huge dreams that feel completely “unrealistic,” declare them possible and then create the circumstances in your life that move those dreams from unreality to reality.

In order to create the impossible, the entrepreneur must undergo a period of complete re-invention in business, life and self — counterintuitively shedding themselves of old beliefs and habits in order to make room for the ideas that will actually help them succeed.

Re-inventing yourself is not about changing what you are “doing” — it’s about changing who you are being.

Re-invention is not a simple as a “pivot” or a new position in the market. It’s not just about doing better work. It’s about changing your relationship to the past, present and future so that you become capable of accomplishing anything you declare possible, regardless of your past or current experiences.

An entrepreneur cannot re-invent their products, company or culture without first re-inventing themselves. It takes courage.

Related: 7 Powerful Tools for Reinventing You and Your Business

As author Tracy Goss would say, “Re-invention is putting at stake the success you’ve become for the power of making the impossible happen.”

Anybody who seeks the power to create the impossible through re-invention can follow the guideposts until the road ends, but each re-invention is unique. Great CEOs, athletes, artists and world leaders have always endured the fires of change as they re-invented themselves.

You can study great leaders and icons to understand how and why their re-inventions happened — but you’ll never be able to copy the process. Re-invention can be triggered externally, but must take place internally.

Your re-invention will happen through a series of transformations that fundamentally change your understanding of who you are and what you’re capable of, creating quite literally a different person on the other side who has no recollection of the limitations of the past.

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/322501?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email

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ByCarolyn Keane

The Best Places to Live in America

These spots combine economic growth, affordability, and quality of life. See all 50:

Best Places to Live in 2018

 

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ByCarolyn Keane

Why Encouraging your Team to Work on Passion Projects Benefits Your Company

In a growing company, juggling side projects and a full-time job is often frowned upon.

by Sam Radocchia, Co-Founder at Chronicled // Blockchain // Forbes 30 Under 30

In a growing company, juggling side projects and a full-time job is often frowned upon.

Everyone is supposed to be focused on one goal and one goal only — building the company. Any work that appears to sway from that overarching goal is viewed in a negative light.

But side projects don’t actually have to steal focus away from the company’s main objective. They can be useful as an outlet for creative energy, as a way to develop employees, and even as a tool to bring in new clients.

It all depends on how you treat these projects. If they’re looked down upon and discouraged, you won’t see any of the benefits.

If leadership embraces the idea of passion projects and offshoots, some spectacular things can happen.

Think of it like a daily walk. It’s comfortable to take the same route every day because you see the same stores, the same people. There may be minor deviations, but usually you know what to expect.

But if you want to see something new, you have to take different streets.

The original path may be trustworthy and dependable, but it won’t ever take you out of your comfort zone or help you see things in a new light. It’s only when you change your route that you run into new people, hear new voices, find new restaurants.

That’s what your side projects are — little side streets that can lead you to new ideas.

Here’s why they’re so important:

Deviating from the norm opens you up to new opportunities.

I’m not advocating you split your attention between multiple time-consuming ventures. Honestly, 90% of your time should be focused on your core business and its requirements.

But sometimes, in order to get where you want to go, you have to take an approach that isn’t totally linear.

I’ll give you an example.

Our team at Chronicled established a company as a passion project called the Blockchain Art Collective (BAC), which is separate from the work we do with supply chains. Recently, we were helping an organization register art and antiquities through the BAC.

And now, that party has expressed interest in using our supply chain capacities to track pharmaceutical drugs — one of our core company solutions.

So what started as a side company ended up bringing our organization business. It wasn’t the most direct route, but it did open up an opportunity we might not have had otherwise.

It can improve employee retention and company sustainability.

Passion projects are often about giving people the time, permission, and resources to do something a little different.

These opportunities can be significant, say a sabbatical after several years of hard work. Or they can be smaller, more frequent breaks for people to pursue their interests.

Allowing employees to invest just 5% of their time at work into related projects can lead to major growth and new discoveries. In fact, it can help attract the younger generation of workers since 78% of Millennials believe being involved in side projectsis beneficial to their careers.

And outside projects give employees some leeway to work outside the strict confines of their normal day-to-day workload.

That outlet can be key to retaining employees for the long run. High turnover rates are costly, not just financially, but in terms of the human capital you lose and the negative impact it can have on morale.

Giving your team an outlet — even one that’s tangentially related to the work they’re doing — is a good way to foster individual growth and keep people from burning out.

Ideas will compound into something bigger and better for your team.

Many people are actually more productive when they have a lot going on.

When they know they need to get several things done in a day, they work harder to meet those deadlines.

I started my first company while I was still getting my Masters. Looking back, it’s hard to believe I was doing all that at once. But that’s how I’ve always been. Even in college I gravitated toward interdisciplinary studies — combining what I learned in my logic or astronomy classes with what I was writing about in my English or anthropology classes.

I never felt like my company and my schoolwork were at odds. I never felt like any one of my classes pulled my attention away from the others.

Instead, I felt like they were compounding and creating new perspectives, thought processes, and ideas.

Side projects at a company don’t have to compete with the main goals. Ideally, team members will apply what they learn from those projects to their work — leading to new ideas, new opportunities, and a more flexible and innovative company

Originally published at medium.com

 

Why Encouraging Your Team To Work On Passion Projects Benefits Your Company

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ByCarolyn Keane

Why Outsourcing Your Invention’s Reviews Increases Efficiency

Image credit: Mila Supinskaya Glashchenko/Shutterstock

Determining whether your invention will be successful or not is an integral part of being an entrepreneur. Here are three reasons inventors are outsourcing the review process to increase efficiency.

When entrepreneurs and companies invent new products or technologies, they are understandably reticent to share their ideas with outsiders. After all, the business landscape is cut throat. They do not want to risk giving away their competitive edge. Still, most entrepreneurs are aware they need some feedback to ensure that their ideas are viable. They may form an internal review team to analyze their prototypes and conduct a market analysis.

While this choice may seem logical, internal invention reviews can be a waste of time and money. External reviews are a smarter choice. For instance, consider independent taste testers, who food companies outsource sensory testing of their products to in order to capture a broad and objective range of preferences. Beware of in-house reviewers, who are often incapable of delivering the objective analysis and insights you need to make sure your product does not fail.

Internal vs. external reviews

We will come back to the point about internal reviews inherently being nonobjective. There are additional reasons to outsource the invention review process. For starters, internal reviews can require significant time and money. Since the team members tasked with the review are employees, they may have to balance this assignment with their other responsibilities.

Generally speaking, internal reviews can take up to 30 hours at minimum, although they can take up to 30 days at larger companies. If you are paying employees over $75,000 per year (and, in the case of an attorney, far more) and you assign several people to the task, you are looking at thousands of hours and potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars to conduct your internal reviews, when they could be working on developing the top ideas and technologies instead. Be aware of where you’re spening money, as very little of your review expenses should be on the front end.

In addition, internal reviewers are not necessarily trained to conduct these types of analyses. A quality product study includes thorough research into your market, competitors and patent prospects. Someone who is not trained to vet ideas for commercial potential will not be able to generate the level of insights and recommendations you need to screen a technology. By comparison, external teams specialize in product analyses.

Privacy can be a concern when inviting outsiders to review your ideas. However, a non-disclosure agreement or confidentiality clause can prohibit external reviewers from revealing any sensitive and proprietary information. There are both legal and business incentives to adhere to these guidelines as the reviewers want to build a reputable business and are not in the business of stealing ideas for themselves. If the right safeguards are in place, you can trust that the review process will not expose your business’s important competitive information.

Here are three ways in which an outside review is more advantageous than an internal report.

Speed

Unlike your team members, review agencies focus solely on compiling invention reports. They can turn around an analysis much faster than your internal staff, and it will include a SWOT analysis, competitive research and intellectual property (IP) research – all the information you need to decide whether to move forward.

Cost

While some consultants charge high rates, many third-party vendors offer fast and affordable services. Instead of paying salaried employees to produce a lackluster review, you can secure a top-quality analysis at a fraction of the cost, freeing up your employees to concentrate on the development of your best ideas and IP assets.

Objectivity

I promised we would come back to this and saved it for last because I cannot stress it enough. When it comes to evaluating your commercial prospects, objectivity is everything. You need input from professionals who have no stake in the product’s performance. A third-party team is solely concerned with getting you informed answers and giving them to you with no pretense. Their jobs and egos do not depend on your product’s success. Those are the people you want reviewing your invention because then you will have solid feedback and perhaps fresh insight into whether your idea can be successful.

The worst thing you can do for your company is go to market blindly or with misinformation. Sourcing high-quality evaluations from professional invention reviewers will provide you with the necessary knowledge to help your company succeed. Whatever the reports contain, it will give you the knowledge to make informed decisions and develop ideas the world really needs and wants.

Why Outsourcing Your Invention’s Reviews Increases Efficiency

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ByCarolyn Keane

Child’s trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome) condition spurs mom’s invention

Biomedical engineer Melanie Watson had plenty to grapple with when prenatal tests during her second trimester revealed her daughter, the second-born of two, had a very serious genetic condition called trisomy 18. In this condition, instead of normal two chromosomes on the 18th chromosomal pair, there are three.

Half of all babies born with trisomy 18, or Edwards syndrome, die within the first week, with many others stillborn. Only 5 percent to 10 percent live beyond age 1.

“She is my miracle baby,” Watson said of Claire Juliette Watson-Ray, now 5½. It’s important to get the one-half in there “because every day counts,” said the Trine University assistant professor of biomedical engineering, who earned her undergraduate and doctorate degrees from Louisiana Tech.

Watson has fought every day for her fragile daughter’s life, not accepting the no-hope pronouncement given by doctors at the Texas hospital where Claire was born and not giving up when Claire, at age 14 months, was diagnosed with liver cancer.

That tenacity and resolve to give Claire the highest quality of life possible is what also led Watson on a journey to seek an innovative solution to quickly and easily perform routine blood tests so Claire — and anyone with a health condition that requires frequent blood testing – can do so wherever and whenever they want, with results sent via a cell phone to the doctor.

The eighth version of the hand-held, blood-testing device prototype is now being 3-D printed, and Watson is in the process of patenting the invention. It is the culmination of more than five years of research and development, and Watson’s entrepreneurial endeavors through her company Blaire Biomedical have drawn high praise from regional and state funders. She was recently named one of two first awardees of support through Indiana’s Elevate Ventures’ new Community Ideation Fund.

The fund, created in 2018, enables ideation-stage high-potential companies to move closer to a specific, measurable technology or product development milestones through an investment between $5,000 and $20,000. Eligible applicants include Indiana-based companies with headquarters in communities under a partnership with Elevate Ventures, and with no more than $50,000 in trailing revenue over the past 12-month period.

Elevate Ventures, a venture development organization based in Indianapolis, Ind., provides entrepreneurs with the expertise and resources needed to transform ideas into profit-making companies. The Community Ideation Fund $17,500 convertible note will help Watson move ahead with final development of the blood-testing device by hiring a part-time design engineer.

“We need to improve the optics (in the device) in order to increase the accuracy of blood tests,” Watson said, noting this funding and a recent $1,000 micro-grant from the Elevate Northeast Indiana Farnsworth Fund, plus additional funding she is seeking through other regional and state sources is crucial. “It is essential for up-and-coming entrepreneurs to get into the seed round to draw venture capitalists and angel investors.”

Already available is a hand-held blood glucose testing device that operates similarly through a phone app, but Watson said there is no other such device on the market that can perform multiple blood tests.

“There has to be a better way”  To read the rest of the story click:

Child’s Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) condition Spurs mom’s invention

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ByCarolyn Keane

The Almost Unbelievable Power of Your Belief Systems

by Dan Dowling Contributor Entrepreneur Magazine

I was horsing around with my dog the other day — I promise this is an article on entrepreneurship — when something extraordinary happened.

We’d been playing tug-of-war with her red doggie blanket when, after 10 minutes of tugging, I finally managed to wrench the festering rag from her clenched, bulldog jowls. I flashed the blanket about like a torero, bowed, then I flipped it behind me and hid it on the small of my back.

Sugar searched frantically for a minute while I sniggered and snarked. Finally, my inner villain satisfied, I dropped her prize in plain view at my feet. Here’s where it gets weird.

“Here’s your blanket, Shoog!” She looked at me vaguely, and again went searching for the missing blanket that was no longer technically missing.

“Sugar, come!” She bounded on the couch and traipsed behind me, actually walking over her blanket at that point, and continued ransacking the living room. That’s when it hit me:

This dog fully believes the blanket has disappeared and that she’ll never see it again. So even though she technically sees the red blanket, the visual (and even tactile) information does her no good. The blanket does not exist.

Bewildered, I picked up the dog rag and gave it a casual flick — “Looking for this?” Sugar’s ears popped up, her pupils dilated, then she dashed at me, mouth a’foaming, for the prize that she had literally stepped on 20 seconds earlier. Because it existed again.

Related: Every Entrepreneur Needs Flow. Nootropics Can Get You There.

Such is the power of the mind.

If you are convinced that something is unattainable, you will be unable to reach it no matter how hard you work. This thing could be waved about you, you could stumble over it, you could wake up next to it without ever realizing it is there because you will still be blind to it. Just like poor Sugar.

So, to all you entrepreneurs out there hustling and grinding every day, it’s time to up your mental game.

Tony Robbins says that taking more action without belief isn’t going to change anything. You need to actually believe the time you spend working is moving you toward your inevitable success, otherwise you’ll find yourself an entrepreneurial Sisyphus, perpetually pushing your boulder up the hill with no results. Because that’s your belief, your negative results will continue reinforcing the negative belief until you change the (freakin’) belief.

You have complete control over this self-fulfilling prophecy. So dedicate yourself to a visualization routine. And it’s gotta be daily.

Start by taking a 15-minute break around lunchtime.

Lie down, sit down, go outside, stay indoors — whatever’s most comfortable for you that you can repeat daily. Then, instead of jumping right into your visuals, you’ll want to prime yourself for five minutes with gratitude. This helps you hack your way into a positive mindset so that your visuals are as powerful as they can be.

Just walk yourself through the experiences that made a difference in your life: the people who never gave up on you, the miracles that got you through. Feel the joy and amazement and appreciation each of these memories brings. Once you’ve worked your way into some authentic smiles and you feel your mind lift, finish your 15-minute break with 10 minutes of visualization.

Get a crystal-clear picture in your mind of your “red blanket.” See yourself doing what you really want to do in your career, in your personal life, for your fitness, for the people you want to help. See yourself holding that prize, and feel yourself reveling in the accomplishment and satisfaction of it. See all the people you’re helping in the process — see the difference you’re making to your customers, to your friends, to your family. Feel joy in advance for these things already happening.

Related: 3 Reasons You Should Adopt an Attitude of Gratitude

Then be consistent.

When you practice this daily — feeling gratitude and certainty for the things you want the most — you will stop worrying about the outcome of your work because you will be carrying the results with you in your mind and in your heart. Instead of finding excuses not to do work, you’ll always have reasons to do whatever it takes. Instead of your daily work feeling like an endless grind like Sisyphus with his boulder, you’ll approach your tasks with an easygoing attitude and a light heart.

But it has to be daily. Do whatever it takes to be consistent.

Start drawing a big X over each calendar day that you visualize, and make it a goal to X-out a whole calendar month. At the end of that month, I promise that you will have more accomplishments, more positivity and more momentum toward whatever is your red blanket.

Related: 5 Mindset Secrets to Achieve Your Goals Faster

To all you would-be entrepreneurs who aren’t putting in the work yet…

It’s time for you to work on your mental game, too. Robbins says that mental aids like visualization are the key to getting started: “Most people have a belief in their potential no matter what anyone else tells them, and that affects how much action they take, which of course affects their results, and that result ironically reinforces their belief.”

When you change your belief — when you generate certainty and positivity through visualization methods — you motivate yourself to do what’s required of you because now you know your work isn’t for nothing. Every day that you work toward your goal, you’re taking a step closer to the goal that you know is possible.

The alternative is to keep telling yourself that your dreams are impossible, and to keep believing that nothing you do will make a difference. Your choice.

The Almost Unbelievable Power of your Belief Systems

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ByCarolyn Keane

A Counterfeiting Operation Ripped Off 2 Inventors. Then They Fought Back, and Won.

When a company copied their invention, Natasha and Fred Ruckel began investigating — and got an inside look into how products are ripped off.

On Valentine’s Day in 2015, Natasha Ruckel and her husband, Fred, were sitting in their living room in Gilboa, N.Y. Natasha was improvising on the piano, and Fred was listening while messing around with the couple’s cat, Yoda. Fred noticed a ripple in the living room rug, forming a half circle on one side. Again and again he tossed toys into the ripple and a delighted Yoda darted in and out. Natasha looked up from her playing. “That’s when we came up with the idea for the Ripple Rug,” she says.

The Ruckels, who had spent around 25 years earning their living in marketing and advertising for brands from PepsiCo to ESPN to Hasbro, were already in the midst of creating their first venture: an app that provided a way for amateur photographers to monetize online images. But they both agreed that the Ripple Rug was a better bet.

A couple of days later, Fred went to Home Depot and bought some cheap pieces of carpet, and they got to work on a prototype. When they had that, they launched a Kickstartercampaign in May 2015, pricing the American-made product at $39.95, to test the market. Within 30 days, they received $15,000 in backing. They had the products made in Georgia for $15 each, and filled the orders.

The Ruckels were weighing their next step when, that fall, the opportunity of a lifetime hit. QVC, in conjunction with the Today show, hosted an ongoing competition called the “Next Big Thing” for entrepreneurs with new retail products. Participants presented their offerings on the TV program, and the winning products received an order from QVC.

Following an arduous vetting process — including proof of a multi­million-dollar insurance policy, a guarantee of having 1,500 items available for sale and sample videos of the Ruckels in pitch mode — Ripple Rug made the cut. “We drove into New York City, and at every exit, we practiced the pitch,” Fred remembers. “We were there by 5 a.m. and hardly slept the night before.”

They sold a few hundred units immediately. QVC bought 1,500 more and Ripple Rug became a top seller. “It was pretty damned amazing,” says Fred. “We were profitable out of the gate, which is virtually unheard of. It felt like a great moment.”

It was, and it wasn’t. Over the next 14 months, the Ruckels learned that coming up with a truly original innovation attracts not only devoted customers but also the kind of highly organized, deep-­pocketed bootleggers who rip off products and systematically grind their inventors into the ground — both financially and emotionally. “It creates so much discord that you are willing to give up the dream of entrepreneurship and go back to your day job,” says Fred.

In the thick of battle, however, the Ruckels learned critical lessons: the importance of copyrighting assets before launching; the reality that people will steal everything from your marketing pitch to your product to your advertising photos; the need to continually patrol for ripoffs and take action. They also got a darkly fascinating glimpse of how ruthless, well-funded, deeply sophisticated bootlegging operations work — and how, with tenacity, vigilance, a good lawyer and the right strategy, they can be beaten.

To read how they won, here is the rest of the article:

Counterfeiting Operation Ripped off 2 Inventors. Then They Fought Back and Won

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ByCarolyn Keane

The Cade Prize rewards inventors and entrepreneurs…..

The Cade Prize rewards inventors and entrepreneurs who demonstrate
a creative approach to addressing problems ​in their field of expertise
​resulting in an innovative, not iterative, invention.

The Cade Prize is one of the largest cash prize competitions for innovation in the state of Florida. It is open only to Florida residents and Florida based companies. Since its launch in 2010, it has drawn hundreds of creative thinkers from Pensacola to Miami. Every year the applications are drawn from diverse sectors. Previous entries have included biomedical, healthcare, IT, tech, environmental, and agricultural ideas. The Cade Prize attracts cutting edge inventions that have a real possibility of making it to market.

The Cade Prize is in search of entrepreneurs, inventors, researchers, and early-stage companies planning to take their idea to market. $50,000 in cash prizes (provided by the Community Foundation of North Central Florida) along with in-kind incentives are awarded to the final top four finishers of the competition each year. The goals of the $50,000 prize are to provide seed capital and publicity for great ideas with market potential. For the first time, awards will be given to the top four entries. The award for first place is $25,000, $15,000 for second place, $7,500 for third place, and $2,500 for 4th place. Individuals and companies with inventions that will remain in Florida for at least one year after the Prize is awarded, are eligible to enter. “Outside investment” is defined as funding from investors; This does not include grants, personal funds, or loans from friends and family.

The Cade Museum for Creativity & Invention is excited to announce that the 2018 Cade Prize is now accepting applications from inventors and entrepreneurs in the state of Florida. For the first time, the Cade Prize will award the top four finalists! The application fee is waived until June 22nd at midnight. Beginning June 23rd, the application fee will be $55.

For more information, please visit www.cademuseum.org or email Ashley Bryant at abryant@cademuseum.org.

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ByCarolyn Keane

The Most Iconic (and Patented) Games

By Gene Quinn & Renee C. Quinn Dec 24, 2017

Christmas 2017 is upon us! Children worldwide will soon be comfortably tucked into their beds as they anxiously await the arrival of Santa Claus (a.k.a. Kris Kingle). This is a great time of the year to be young, or at least young at heart!

Several years ago we profiled the Top 10 Iconic (and Patented) Toys in our Christmas Eve edition. This year we decided to profile the most iconic and patented games, many of which are still likely to be found waiting for good little girls and boys under the Christmas tree. Profiled are Monopoly®, Rubik’s Cube, Battleship, and Rock’em Sock’em Robots, Twister and Simon.

We also want to take this opportunity to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas! Thank you for reading IPWatchdog.com!

 

Monopoly®

Monopoly patentIn 1935 the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued U.S. Patent No. 2,026,082 on Monopoly®, one of the most successful and beloved board games of all time.

As the story goes, Charles Darrow, an unemployed salesman, was struggling to support his family during the Great Depression. It was during this time that he claimed to have fondly remembered summers in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and dreamed about being a real estate mogul. These diversions purportedly lead to him formulating what has become the most popular board game of all time – Monopoly®.

Darrow felt certain he had a hit on his hands so he contacted Parker Brothers, who initially turned him down, but only after explaining that his game violated some 52 fundamental rules of a board successful game. Undeterred, Darrow marketed the game himself. As fate would have it, a friend of Sally Barton, the daughter of Park Brothers’ founder, George Parker, bought the game. At the time Mrs. Barton’s husband was the President of Parker Brothers. One thing lead to another and eventually Parker Brothers became convinced that this game, with minor modifications, could be a huge success. As a result of his invention Darrow became the first millionaire game inventor, thanks to royalty payments.

The irony, however, is that Darrow may not have invented the game at all, but rather he may have taken a locally popular game and made only a few changes. By the time Parker Brothers realized that Darrow might not have been the true inventor the game was already a huge success. To protect the game and its investment the decision was made to buy up all patents and copyrights on any related game, thereby ensuring the monopoly on Monopoly®.

 

Rubik’s Cube

One of the most popular games of the 1980s was the Rubik’s Cube, a puzzle game that proved enormously frustrating to many who attempted to unlock its solution.

Invented in 1974 by Hungarian inventor Ern? Rubik, the device was patented in the United States with the issuance of U.S. Patent No. 4,378,116 on March 29, 1983, with the title Spatial logical toy.

On a classic Rubik’s Cube, each of the six faces is covered by nine stickers, each of one of six colors: white, red, blue, orange, green, and yellow. See WikipediaA Rubik’s Cube craze captured worldwide attention in the 1980s, with tournaments and even the Guinness Book of World Records recognizing the fastest attempts to solve the puzzle.

Today the Rubik’s Cube has been a part of pop culture for decades, and has once again gained a new following with over 40,000 YouTube pages dedicated to the puzzle game.

 

Battleship

BattleshipAnother long time favorite game is BattleshipU.S. Patent No. 1,988,301 was issued on January 15, 1935 under the title Game board, the originally patented game does not bear a lot of resemblance to the one that many of us grew up playing.

The patent explains that the invention relates to a perforated game board and pins insertable in the perforations. Although the patent explains that this perforated game board could be used for number of different games, the game we know as Battleship is described.

“The game herein illustrated as in progress might be called Battleships,” the patent reads. The game is described as requiring two players to sit facing each other. “One player, making use preferably of some erasable marking means, such as chalk, places an enclosure or line around a number of arbitrarily chosen series of perforations in groups of 4 (representing a battleship), in groups of 3 (a cruiser). The patent explains that play will go back and forth with each player calling out shots at the unseen target created by the other player. “Play continues thus and when one of the series of perforations within an enclosure has been filled with pins, that ‘ship’ is ‘sunk’.”

 

Rock’em Sock’em Robots

Rock'em Sock'em RobotsU.S. Patent No. 3,235,259, titled Toy boxers, was issued on February 15, 1966. The patent explains: “It is the primary object of this invention to provide a new and amusing toy in the form of a novel boxing game manually operated by opposing players.” Inventors Marvin Glass, Harry Disko and Burton Meyer, assigned the patent to Marvin Glass & Associates, and the first version of the Rock’em Sock’em Robots game was manufactured by Louis Marx and Company in 1964.

Rock’em Sock’em Robots was a game of battling robots, with each player trying to knock the others head off the block. The Red Rocker and the Blue Bomber would battle it out inside the ring.

Designed for two players, this boxing game required each player to a robot by operating the mechanism with his or her thumbs.

 

 

Twister

Twister has to make this list just because of the patent art on display in Fig. 3 (to the left) alone.

Invented by Charles Foley and Neil Rabens, and assigned to Milton Bradley Company, U.S. Patent No. 3,454,279, titled Apparatus for playing a game wherein the players constitute the game pieces, was patented on July 8, 1969. The patent explains: “The invention relates to a method of and equipment for playing a game of skill and chance for amusement and exercise purposes.”

The game is played with a playing surface the size of a large blanket, which has “a plurality of columns of loci, said loci being of such size and so spaces as to enable the players to place a hand or a foot on any designated locus, the columns of loci being different colors…” Don’t you just love the way patent attorneys write?

A “chance device” such as a spinner is included with the game. Someone not playing (i.e., a referee) will spin the wheel and call out a hand or foot with a corresponding color, which requires the players to twist and contort themselves in order to place the appropriate hand or foot on the color. The object of the game is to move into the appropriate position without falling. If a player falls or touches an elbow or knee to the surface the game is over and the other player declared the winner.

 

Simon

Ralph Baer, Hall of Fame inventor of the video console, was also the co-inventor of this extraordinarily popular, frustrating, and fun game. Baer, along with co-inventor Howard Morrison, invented this electronic game in the late 1970s, and launched in 1978.

U.S. Design Patent No. D253,786 was issued on Christmas Day 1979 (Fig. 1 of the patent shown left). While that might seem odd to many, the United States Patent and Trademark Office issues patents every Tuesday, and December 25, 1979 happened to be a Tuesday. Obviously, all the work to allow the patent to be done was complete well in advance. In the U.S. a patent is not officially issued until it is published, which occurred on Christmas Day 1979.

For those not familiar with this iconic game, the device is made up of four colored buttons, which light in a series. The player must repeat the sequence correctly once the lights stop. Each time the player successfully completes the correct sequence the sequence becomes longer, and as the player continues the sequence gets faster and faster. This game can still be purchased today, but the new age Simon Optix seems more virtual reality headset than anything else. In an attempt to keep the game fresh for the next generation you wear the headset and wave your hand in front of the proper color in sequence. Other varieties of this classic game include the Simon Swipe and Simon Air.

 

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ByCarolyn Keane

MIT’s Take on Entrepreneurship

ENTREPRENEURSHIP IS A CRAFT.
HONE IT.

Entrepreneurship and innovation are synonymous with MIT. Big thinkers from around the world come to MIT Sloan Executive Education to take advantage of our renowned faculty, research, and resources that can help turn their ideas into successful ventures or social impact.

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We hope these resources help ignite your entrepreneurial spark and guide your next steps. Click below and get the Took Kit

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